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patient-storyPara leer esta historia en español, visite nuestra página en el Internet: spauldingrehab.org/about/patient-stories/braiden-spanish. Does something meaningful hang on your walls at home? For Braiden Norton, it’s a special piece of artwork displayed in his bedroom—a canvas the 15-year-old painted while he was a patient at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. Braiden came to Spaulding after his third surgery for a tumor found on his brainstem when he was just one year old. The surgery left him unable to walk, talk, swallow, or communicate beyond a thumbs-up or -down signal, and it was a heart-wrenchingly difficult time for Braiden and his devoted dad, Phil. But just 32 days later, father and son walked out Spaulding’s doors together. They were heading home. Spaulding’s pediatric therapy and child-life teams help our youngest patients and their families do the activities they love, even as they go through treatment. One popular activity is syringe art—a creative way to paint using a common medical device. Braiden’s syringe art hangs above his desk, a reminder of the transformational journey and care he experienced at Spaulding. Your walls might display meaningful art, mementos from adventures, or cherished family photos. At Spaulding, our walls are decorated with patient art—and the names of our most generous donors.

Meet Braiden

patient-story

Para leer esta historia en español, visite nuestra página en el Internet: spauldingrehab.org/about/patient-stories/braiden-spanish.

Does something meaningful hang on your walls at home?

For Braiden Norton, it’s a special piece of artwork displayed in his bedroom—a canvas the 15-year-old painted while he was a patient at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital.

Braiden came to Spaulding after his third surgery for a tumor found on his brainstem when he was just one year old. The surgery left him unable to walk, talk, swallow, or communicate beyond a thumbs-up or -down signal, and it was a heart-wrenchingly difficult time for Braiden and his devoted dad, Phil. But just 32 days later, father and son walked out Spaulding’s doors together. They were heading home.

Spaulding’s pediatric therapy and child-life teams help our youngest patients and their families do the activities they love, even as they go through treatment. One popular activity is syringe art—a creative way to paint using a common medical device. Braiden’s syringe art hangs above his desk, a reminder of the transformational journey and care he experienced at Spaulding.

Your walls might display meaningful art, mementos from adventures, or cherished family photos. At Spaulding, our walls are decorated with patient art—and the names of our most generous donors. A multi-media installation at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston honors donors who give $1,000 or more each year. To see the list of this past year’s donors, and the installation, click here. To make your own gift to Spaulding, click here.

Much like his artwork offers Braiden and his dad hope and encouragement, donor generosity—showcased on our wall—inspires all members of the Spaulding community. And what’s more, donations provide the much-needed resources to help patients and families like Braiden and his dad find their strength on the path to recovery.

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